theatre project 2

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FINAL PROJECT DIRECTIONS

Choose an idea and direction that sparks you the most, that you can truly enjoy and can stretch

toward the “final bow” to our explorations. Select one among the following items:

A. Create a Symbolic Mask and Character

Imagine a character that can be envisioned as “larger than life,” and that has

symbolic

correlations. Think about the

character’s main drive, traits and layers

. It can be an exaggerated

human character, a fantasy character, a surrealistic character, or any style and make-up of

character that you can dream up.

Give purpose and definition to the character.

Create a mask that evokes the style, symbolism

and traits for your original character.

View the “Masks” document

to gather ideas and directions regarding characters,

materials that can be used, and methods of construction.

You will photograph the STAGES of CONSTRUCTION to your mask.

This is important,

so that I see the process and evolution of your artistry.

Without these, I cannot give you credit for actual construction.

You will post the stages of construction and the final mask onto a document.

After the final mask picture, explain the character, the traits and attitudes, the situation, etc. of

this character.

This is a very important aspect to the project.

As with our design connections,

and as a playwright who understands conflict and layers,

use details to explain this character.

USE A MASK CHARACTER OF YOUR OWN VISION and

DESIGN.

Do not use any known characters from any genre of art, writing, film,

cartoon, etc.

Remember that your written connections are most important!

B. Create a Puppet Character

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Imagine a character that can be manipulated as a puppet. Give this character motivation, traits,

and determine what aspects of the character lend themselves to puppetry.

Give purpose and definition to the character.

Create a puppet that evokes the style, symbolism

and traits for your original character.

Create a puppet character that

evokes the style, symbolism, traits and personality layers you

want to imbue

. You can create a human character, fantasy character, expressionistic character, or

any style and make-up of character that you can dream up.

View the “Puppetry and Theatre” document

to gather ideas and directions

regarding characters, types of puppets, and materials that can be used.

Noted puppetry artist Basil Twist

You will photograph the STAGES of CONSTRUCTION to your puppet.

This is important,

so that I see the process and evolution of your artistry.

Without these, I cannot give you credit for actual construction.

You will post the stages of construction and the final puppet onto a document.

After the final puppet picture, explain the character, the traits and attitudes, the situation, etc. of

this character.

This is a very important aspect to the project.

As with our design connections,

and as a playwright who understands conflict and layers,

use details to explain this character.

USE A PUPPET CHARACTER OF YOUR OWN VISION and DESIGN.

Do not use any known characters from any genre of art, writing, film, cartoon, etc.

Remember that your written connections are most important!

C. Write Three Monologues Under a Theme

Compose the monologues with

three separate characters

. These characters will be

“linked”

by a theme

that you choose.

(Remember Chair Monologues from Week 1.)

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The characters may know each other, or may be quite separate from each other with different

points of view, different times or spaces, etc. They will all link to your main theme.

Think of ways that these

three separate and distinct voices

“mesh,” compare and contrast, to

give the audience an array of perspectives to your main idea/theme.

View the “Monologue Examples” document

to see two examples of other

monologues. BE SURE to read the italicized notes at the end of each monologue to further

“meshing voices” under a theme ideas.

There are a myriad of ways to link three separate monologues from three separate characters into

a main theme. Several famous broadway and off-broadway plays have done this.

Put some time into thinking

what main theme would give you FUN fuel

to use with characters,

conflict and connections.

Also be sure to write for the stage; visualize your characters in this

manner.

Use minimal stage directions and scene set-up for each character. NOTE the setting and “at rise”

set-up for both monologue examples.

Format:

12-point Times New Roman, no more than one-inch margins on all four sides, 1.5-inch

spacing for the monologue.(Single-space any beginning set-up, setting info and stage directions.)

Use only one line for your name before the set-up, character name and the first monologue.

Use a separate page for each monologue.

Minimum length for each monologue: 3/4 page

Remember to look at set and character voices thoughtfully, and envision for the stage.

FUN abounds with more visions!

D. Create a “Found Space” Stage

“Found space” has long been used throughout history for performance. Before there were

theatre buildings, societies used any space that fit the needs for storytelling, acting, movement

and dance. Sometimes, spaces are used for impromptu performances. Other times, the

performances are marketed and used for festival audiences or with advanced ticket sales.

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Open the “Found Space” document

for ideas about spaces found in small towns,

roadsides, cities, home, office, school, etc.

Select a space that lends itself to some type of theatrical scene performance.

You will create a “theatrical” atmosphere in that space.

Simply think of what characters will be acting in the space, what the conflict is about, and what

is needed for these characters/voices to perform in your found space.

You do not have to have a specific play or scene in mind (you can do this, also, if you wish); just

invent your characters, relationship and conflict.

The type of scene

you invent will dictate

what

type of space you want to select.

Just be sure that, whatever you select, items needed for the scene will fit into your car or truck.

Your primary component for the found space will be:

Creating a dynamic visual “thrust.”

You will add set pieces and props

. Your set pieces can be realistic or made out of cardboard, as

long as it supports the

meaning and style of your invented scene.

Use your imagination to shape the found space for the scene.

Abstract examples:

One set I saw outside had hammers hanging from trees and nails scattered

on the ground. Another had yo-yos stacked and scattered along a sidewalk, with colorful muslin

fabric “twists” hanging from lanterns.

You will photograph the finalized stage set and space from several angles.

After posting your photo on a document, explain the set and atmosphere, its purpose, style and

meaning, symbolism, what characters are envisioned in the space, their situation, conflict,

relationship, etc.

This is a very important aspect to the project.

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If you wish, it would also be good to have someone be a “character” in the scene with the photo.

If you add this, think of their costume and how it can fit.

SPECIAL NOTE: If your found space is city-owned, business-owned or privately-owned, then

be sure to get permission to stage your scene on that property.

SPECIAL NOTE: Do not use your own apartment or living space. Do not use a friend’s

apartment or living space.

Find an unusual space that can support a small audience or cluster of

on-lookers.

You may use

any outdoor area

that surrounds you or is part of a friend/family space.

INVENT, SHAPE AND ENJOY!!!!

 
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